Our goal is to reduce absenteeism in our schools.

  • By keeping your children home when necessary, our schools are healthier overall. Common colds with coughs and runny/stuffy noses can linger for a week or two past the contagious period. Typically, children with these symptoms should be in school if no fever is present. Please call the School Nurse if you are not sure whether your child should attend school.

    Does your child have a fever?
    A child with a fever over 100 degrees must be kept at home. Even in the absence of other symptoms, a fever is usually indicative of an infection, which could be contagious. Please do not give your child Tylenol or Ibuprofen to reduce the fever and then send him/her to school. He or she may be exposing other children to illness. Your child may return to school when the fever has been gone for at least 24 hours.

    Does your child have a rash?
    Any rash that is undiagnosed needs to be examined by your health care provider. If the rash is not contagious, your child may come back to school immediately. If contagious, please follow your provider’s instructions as to when it is okay to return to school (a doctor’s note is also appreciated). Normally, if the rash is not weeping and can be fully covered, it is okay to be in school.
     
    Does your child have pinkeye?
    Pinkeye (conjunctivitis) is common and can be caused by many things: bacteria, virus, allergies. Your child can be in school if there is no drainage from the eye. If the eye is painful, extremely itchy, is draining, or if the child’s vision is affected, your child should be seen by a medical doctor or eye doctor.
     
    Has your child experienced vomiting or diarrhea?
    Your child must stay at home until 24 hours after the last episode of vomiting or diarrhea.
     
    Does your child require antibiotics?
    If your child has been prescribed antibiotics to treat an illness, the child must be on medication for a minimum of 24 hours before returning to school. Certain illnesses (exa. Pertussis) require the child to finish the course of antibiotics before returning to school.

    Our goal is to reduce absenteeism in our schools. By keeping your children home when necessary, our schools are healthier overall. Common colds with coughs and runny/stuffy noses can linger for a week or two past the contagious period. Typically, children with these symptoms should be in school if no fever is present. Please call the School Nurse if you are not sure whether your child should attend school.

    Head LiceIf live lice are present:
    Parents will be notified immediately and the student sent home. School Nurse will provide information and recommendations to the family for treating head lice. Parents of classroom contacts will be notified at the discretion of the School Nurse. The student may return to school when the first treatment is completed and no live lice are present.

    If nits (eggs) are present:
    Parents will be notified. The student may remain in school until the end of the day. The student may return to school when the first treatment is completed, efforts have been made to remove nits, and no live lice are present.  Lice are spread from one person to another by very close, usually household, contact. They do not jump or fly. They can be spread by sharing personal items such as hats, scarves and brushes or combs.

    Anyone can get head lice. Head lice are very small brownish-colored insects that live on the head. They lay eggs (called nits) close to the scalp. The eggs are tiny (size of the eye of a small needle) and gray or white in color.
     
    Symptoms:
    Itching of the head and neck. Look for: 1) crawling lice in the hair, usually there aren't very many; 2) eggs (nits) glued to the hair, often found behind the ears and at the back of the neck; and 3) scratch marks on the head or back of the neck at the hairline.
     
    Spread:
    Head-to-head contact and through sharing of personal items such as combs, brushes, hats, scarves, hair accessories and pillows.  Lice do not jump or fly. Head lice do not live longer than 48 hours off the head. They only lay their eggs while on the head. Lice do not spread to or from pets. 
     
    Contagious Period:
    Until treated with a lice killing product.  It can take several weeks to completely remove lice from a household. 
     
    *Several nits are seen here on the hair shaft.
     
     
    *Louse and nits
     
     
    If you think your child has Head Lice:
      • Call your healthcare provider or pharmacy for recommendations on treatment products. Tell your school and childcare provider (if applicable)
      • Treat your child for head lice and check child's head and remove nits daily. If all nits are not removed, some may hatch and your child will get lice again.
      • Check everyone in the house for head lice. Treat only household members with head lice and treat them all at once.
      • The child will need to stay home from school until after the first treatment is completed and no live lice are seen.
               
    Treatment
      • Follow the product directions carefully. With certain products, a second treatment is recommended 7-10 days after the first.
      • Removing the nits is a very important part of the treatment! Lice killing products are not typically effective in killing nits. Nits must be physically removed from the hair shaft. Nits are glued onto the hair shaft as they are laid. To remove the nits, use a special nit comb, your fingernails, or cut the hair very short.
      • Continue checking the head and combing hair daily for 2 weeks.
      • Vacuum carpets, upholstered furniture, mattresses and seats in the car thoroughly.
      • Wash clothing, bedding and towels in hot water and dry in a hot dryer for at least 20 minutes before using again. Clothing, stuffed toys, linens or backpacks that cannot be washed or dried can be dry cleaned or sealed in a plastic bag for 2 weeks.
         How to Remove Nits
         Work in a well-lit room or under a bright lamp (using a magnifying glass may help you see the nits)
    • Divide the hair into 4 parts and divide each part into 1-inch sections.
    • Starting at the scalp, use a metal nit comb or your fingernails to comb each hair section individually.
    • Use the comb or your fingernail to slide eggs off the hair shaft or use scissors to cut hair shafts that have nits glued to them.
    • Remove all nits each time you comb the hair.
    • REMEMBER: It can take at least 2 weeks to get rid of lice.